Tuesday, January 29, 2008

Reviews:: The Weather Station East

Ontario is a hot bed for challenging folk music right now. Countless acts are cropping up and each one seems to push the limits of the genre in a different way. Tamara Lindeman - aka The Weather Station - is no exception. This little EP opens with a bang, as Tamara's gospel/soul vocals boom over slow drawn strings, banjo and noise filled electric work. The song is only lasts for 3 minutes, but the anticipation she builds works well. You keep expecting her to take the easy way out and let the song break into a gallop, but she holds the reigns tight refusing to give in.

As a result, when the second track - Amaranth - breaks into a more up-tempo banjo and string riff, you want to run alongside the until your lungs collapse. One thing for certain, Tamara doesn't find a riff and let it play out. The fragmented instrumentation she adds chops up the finger picked banjo and contrasts the emotional ohs and ahs.

Even the more traditional title track draws you close with the slow summer day meandering melody and the nice falsetto, but she lets the banjo and piano often work against each other. While this might sound odd on the outside, it works well as the slight hiccup makes the track stand out and keep you listening intently. The New Bird is another track filled with intensity, using a syncopated rhythm and only the slightest of vocals to form the song.

Trying to classify the Weather Station as a folk band is a stretch. Sure Tamara uses all of the elements, but the little things like the spacey noise that buzzes behind the melody of The Hunter makes calling it folk a cop out. This EP is an initial preview of Tamara's upcoming, narrative full length. I can't wait to see how she ties the whole package together, as these songs on their own make quite an impression.
[MP3]:: East

myspace::

Posted at 2:36 PM by ack :: 1 comments

add to facebook add to del.icio.us Digg this Googlize this post add to Yahoo


At 3:12 PM, Anonymous matthew did sayeth:

She's also in Entire Cities, which brings the number of awesome bands of which she's a member to two.

 

Post a Comment