Eazy, hey Eazy

What’s up

Why you wear your pants like that?

I wear my pants like this, for easy access baby

 

I’m not sure why, but when I think about Eazy-E’s solo work, I think of his debut album and the above line from We Want Eazy. I’m guessing it’s because that line used to make me laugh back in the day, and it kind of sums up Eazy for me: although the subject matter in his songs was far from funny, Eric Wright always seemed to be wearing the kind of smirk on his face that suggested he didn’t take himself too seriously. Or maybe he was just a little bit crazy, after all, I recently read a bon-kares interview with The D.O.C. that insinuated Eazy was into Devil worshiping or some such, so there’s a good chance that he might have been a little loony.

 

Loony or not, it’s hard to deny to impact Eazy, N.W.A and the whole Ruthless posse had on hip hop. Since this past Saturday was the 16th anniversary of Eazy’s death, and Nate Dogg’s passing had me in the R.I.P. mindset, I thought we’d have an Eazy-E OSM this week. It seems hard to discern exactly how much credit Eazy deserves in the ascension of the whole Gangster rap phenomenon, but it seems clear that he was certainly in the middle of things when it was going down. He might have intended to only be a money man in the beginning, and only became an MC out of necessity, but that’s kind of irrelevant now - you cannot think of the origins of West Coast gangster rap without Eazy-E.

 

I could continue fumbling around for ways to describe Eazy, but I think you’d be better off checking this Ego Trip remembrance of him by Brian “B+” Cross. We’ll simply leave you with a few Eazy songs for you to get nostalgic over, or discover for the first time. We’ve got his first track, the original version of The Boyz In The Hood, and then of course the rather classic title track from his debut album Eazy-Duz-It. Man, if you aren’t old as us, you might not be able to comprehend how mesmerizing, in a “whoa, should I be hearing any of this” way, that songs like this were for a junior high kid - the rhymes, Dre’s production, everything about this, and the songs on Straight Outta Compton were a complete mind-JFK-er.

 

Also a mind-JFK-er, he mentions being born in ’73 on that song, which would have made him 15 - this is another instance of Eazy’s not taking himself seriously, apparently joking about his small stature and kid-voice, he references this fake-birth date “scandal” on the aforementioned We Want Eazy, which is kind of comical. So to switch things up, we’ve got the slightly re-worked remix version of We Want Eazy, which I’d never heard before, and also seems to contain a geetar-solo rendition of Auld Lang Syne from Ruthless legend Stan The Guitar Man, and that is rather awesome. We’ll finish with something a little more serious, 1993′s Real Muthaphukkin’G's which was a rebuttal to Dre, whose departure obviously burned Eazy bigtime, either on a personal level or because he realized how much cash he was going to be missing out on.

 

Enjoy, and RIP Eazy.

 

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

MP3:: Eazy-E - The Boyz In The Hood

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

MP3:: Eazy-E - Eazy-Duz-It

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

MP3:: Eazy-E - We Want Eazy (Remix)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

MP3:: Eazy-E - Real Muthaphukkin’G's

VIDEO:: Eazy-E - We Want Eazy

VIDEO:: Eazy-E - Real Muthaphukkin G’s